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Meet the Winners of Our 2020 World Contraception Day Sticker Contest

Meet the Winners of Our 2020 World Contraception Day Sticker Contest

  • Ally Khantzis
    By: Ally Khantzis
    Updated:

September 26 is World Contraception Day, an annual global campaign that aims to raise awareness about birth control and empower individuals to take control of their sexual and reproductive health. At a time when nearly 4 million women relying on sexual and reproductive health services are expected to lose job-based health insurance as a result of the pandemic, broadening access to birth control is more important than ever.

Though World Contraception Day might feel different this year, it remains an opportunity to celebrate birth control as essential health care—which is core to our mission. In this spirit, we invited Pill Club’s community to submit designs for our monthly sticker that’s included in our care packages. The challenge: to design a sticker that’s inspired by how birth control has made a difference in their lives. We were amazed by the personal stories from our community. Whether to regulate their periods, prevent unplanned pregnancy, or help manage acne, birth control has given our members a sense of agency and confidence.

Below is a roundup of the winning sticker that went out in this month’s deliveries, as well as the other finalists. If you’re interested in participating in a future sticker challenge, keep an eye out for updates in our next newsletter!

The Winner

Meet Alice: I currently work at the food-tech company, AppApp. I love art, dogs, video games, volunteering, DIY crafts, and food! One day, I hope to start my own small business! 

What’s the story behind your design?

Rosie the Riveter (from the famous “We Can Do It” poster during World War II) was the inspiration behind my design. To me, this seemed like a wonderful representation of female empowerment, specifically in terms of how birth control has propelled feminism and let women stay in control of their own futures and careers. I also wanted to bring to light some different birth control options available (not just condoms!).

Why is having access to birth control important to you?

With birth control, I can focus on my future and career and plan for a baby when I’m ready. I’ve never had regular periods, so birth control has also given me a sense of normalcy and routine.

Why do you think we still haven’t moved past the stigma around birth control?

There’s  still an assumption that birth control is solely for sex and to prevent pregnancies. In reality, women use it for a plethora of reasons, including treating polycystic ovary syndrome, regulating periods, controlling acne, and helping with menstrual cramps.

Our Other Finalists

Meet Claire: I’ve always been interested in design—both artistically and through using human-centered design thinking to make an impact and drive change in the world.

What’s the story behind your design?

My design represents how we must continue to stand up for our rights and make our voices heard to rightfully gain control of our lives and futures. We must stay strong, optimistic, and united. In terms of the design elements, the sun represents a brighter future that we’re fighting for, the black clothes represent strength and resilience, and the fists that go past the border of the sun symbolize us breaking the boundaries. Fun fact: this sticker is made entirely from small shapes in PowerPoint!

Why is having access to birth control important to you?

Birth control has allowed me to feel more in control of my decisions. It’s empowered me to live my life with less worries and more confidence.

Why do you think we still haven’t moved past the stigma around birth control?

In general, people still find sexual health and sex positivity to be difficult topics to talk about openly. There’s also still a lot of misconceptions about birth control. For example, birth control isn’t only used to prevent pregnancy, but also provides many other health benefits, such as regulating menstrual cycles, clearing acne, and reducing the risk of cancer. To defeat this stigma, we must be cognizant of the many health and societal benefits that birth control provides—and we must be willing to have open-minded and transparent conversations.

Meet Emily: I recently moved from Kansas City to New York City to pursue my dream of being a filmmaker. I love painting, baking, and plants!

What’s the story behind your design?

My design was based on the idea that birth control is normal and something that should be talked about. At first glance, it shows that all unique kinds of women use birth control. Then in the background, I used different words that I associate with birth control in the form of hashtags, because social media is a great place to start these conversations and have women’s voices be heard.

Why is having access to birth control important to you?

I’ve been on birth control since I was a teenager. I remember having a really uncomfortable conversation with my mom asking if I could get on the pill because I have iron deficiency anemia. In hindsight, I don’t know why that conversation had to be as uncomfortable as it was! Hopefully, we can normalize talking about these things for whatever reasons women feel the need to use it. Today, I use it so I can focus on my career and my dream of working in the film industry—and to create a better situation to eventually bring kids into!

Why do you think we still haven’t moved past the stigma around birth control?

People aren’t aware of all of birth control’s uses— it helps so many women in their lives in many ways. Talking about it more openly would definitely help even more women in controlling their own lives and futures.

Meet Jennifer: I have a degree in graphic design because my mother is an artist. From a young age I was exposed to and intrigued by art in all of its forms. Up until the day I received the email for this sticker contest, I hadn’t really done much art outside of school or work. This sticker contest seemed like a great opportunity for me to get back into designing more for pleasure about subjects that I’m passionate about.

What’s the story behind your design?

I wanted to focus on things that are important in my life and reflect my own experiences, which I know other women have experienced as well. I feel like a lot of people in our society have this preconceived notion that men are above women and have the right to dictate what we can and can’t do based on how it makes them look or feel. I’m a strong believer of “My Body, My Choice,” and even though this sticker design is small, I believe it has a strong message behind it that many women will identify with.

Why is having access to birth control important to you?

Since the beginning of my journey through menstruation, my body has had a lot of difficulties navigating proper hormone levels. Because of this—and other medical conditions—I started birth control at a very young age. This is why my design focuses more on the pill as opposed to other forms of birth control/contraception. The pill has allowed me to function somewhat normally in society without having to miss out on things that I use to be in too much pain to do. I wouldn’t have been able to accomplish all that I have without it.

Why do you think we still haven’t moved past the stigma around birth control?

I think a lot of it has to do with miscommunication and a lack of general knowledge. Most of the time, birth control and contraception are viewed as bad because it means someone is having sex, which shouldn’t be shamed in the first place. What many fail to understand is that in most cases, these tools are used more often than not to assist in medical conditions and to keep your body safe from people who are not properly practicing safe practices. The fact that birth control is considered taboo makes for more and more people not practicing healthy and safe choices. Unaware of the effects that can be caused due to their ignorance, these same people are the ones forcing women to not wear condoms or take their birth control.

Meet Sarah: A creative and native of NYC, I love spending time with friends, exploring new places, and creating things that make others smile.

What’s the story behind your design?

I wanted to show birth control as a bright, beautiful thing. By saturating the slogan and design in color and framing the pills themselves with a sun-like shape, I hope to change the narrative of taking birth control as something you may feel the need to hide into something fun, light, and pretty that you would actually want to display on your computer or phone. By showing the pill this way, and associating it with pride, I hope to normalize and celebrate birth control in a way that might challenge the stigma against it.

Why is having access to birth control important to you?

Birth control represents the bodily autonomy my friends and I have a right to. No matter your personal choices, the freedom to make those choices for your own body is a right that all women deserve to enjoy and take part in as they choose.

Why do you think we still haven’t moved past the stigma around birth control?

As much as we have progressed as a society, women’s bodily autonomy is still a politicized issue. People still want control over women’s bodies and the choices they make with regard to their sexual and physical well-being. The idea of women engaging in consensual, recreational sex with the protection of birth control challenges that control.



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